Slow Philosophy and Prayer

We live in a fast-paced world. With computers, fast food, 24-hour news channels, social media, and instant messaging we can feel antsy when we need to sit down and concentrate on anything for longer than 10 minutes. The Slow Movement encompasses many different topics; slow food, slow parenting, slow cities and slow travel are just a few of the different iterations of this philosophy. In a nutshell, what the Slow Movement seeks to do is to slow down the pace of life. Instead of rushing around trying to compete in the game of life, we need to slow down and become aware that the things that make life worth living cannot always be found instantaneously at the push of a button.

In Carl Honoré’s newest book The Slow Fix: Solve Problems, Work Smarter and Live Better in a World Addicted to Speed he relates an anecdote about a Monsignor he met while giving a talk to the Young Presidents’ Organization on Slow Philosophy. After the talk was finished the Monsignor came over and told him that he had a confession to make. His confession? That lately he had been “doing things in the wrong way.” He had been praying too fast.

To this end we need to ask ourselves, have I been praying too fast? Am I no longer in the moment when I pray? Am I praying while simultaneously thinking about the day at work, what I need to do later, what to make for dinner, or which bills need to be paid?

We can’t fire off prayers to God like a series of tweets. A connection with God must be cultivated, conscious and thoughtful. We all need to make sure to leave enough time for the important things in life: our family, our friends and our faith.

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